Sea Devil II SSN-664 - History

Sea Devil II SSN-664 - History


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Sea Devil II

(SSN-664: dp. 3,800 (surf.), 4,600 (subm.), 1. 292'3" b. 31'3", dr. 28'8", s. 20+k., cpl. 107; a. 4 21'' tt. SUBROC; cl. Sturgeon)

The second Sea Devil (SSN-664) was laid down on 12 April 1966 by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va., launched on 5 October 1967, sponsored by Mrs. Ignatius J. Galantin, and commissioned on 3 January 1969, Lt. Comdr. Richard A. Currier in command.

Assigned to Submarine Division 62 at Norfolk, Sea Devil has, into 1975, conducted exercises and participated in operations which enhance her capabilities in her primary mission, antisubmarine warfare.

Sea Devil was decommissioned on 16 October 1991 and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register the same day. Her scrapping via the Nuclear-Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington, began on 1 March 1998 and was completed on 7 September 1999.


Sea Devil II SSN-664 - History

The following men were lost while serving on vessels that were not sunk. Men who were lost in non-sinking events whose vessels were later lost are included with their shipmates on the individual boats' pages.

Please note that we have recently updated this page to include hundreds of active-duty submariners that died in accidents, of illness, of suicide, or in other incidents. Much of this information was varified online through the National Archives - Defense Casualty Analysis System (DCAS) Public Use File, 1950-2005, 6/28/1950 - 5/28/2006 and 1/1/2006 - 12/31/2006.

Some names have not yet been verified. The three men listed as lost on USS Flasher (SSN-613) were civilian shipyard workers killed in a fire aboard the vessel. Two other civilian painters were killed in an explosion aboard USS Sirago (SS-485).

Click on a man's name to go to his personal memorial page on this site. Photographs and personal information are needed as indicated in the column at right.


MCPON (SS/SW) Rick West, USN (Ret.) - First Distinguished Sea Service Award Senior Enlisted

The Commander General of the Naval Order of the United States is pleased to announce the selection of MCPON (SS/SW) Rick West, USN (Ret.) as the first recipient of the Distinguished Sea Service Award for Senior Enlisted (DSSA-SE). The DSSA-SE was established to provide a means of recognition for a recently retired sea service enlisted member whose distinguished career contributed significantly to the sea service.

This award recognizes MCPON West’s unique contribution to the U. S. Navy through a career that spanned over thirty years and service in both submarines and surface ships. His leadership responsibilities ranged from the division level on a submarine to selection as the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, the U. S. Navy’s most senior enlisted position. His service is characterized by a constant concern for Sailors and their families and the preparation of enlisted personnel to assume the responsibilities of leadership as Chief Petty Officers through the CPO 360 program.

MCPON West will receive the DSSA-SE Award at the Naval Order’s Annual Congress on Saturday, 24 October 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

MCPON West was born in Rising Fawn, Ga. He graduated from Northwest Georgia High School in 1981 and immediately entered the U.S. Navy.

West received recruit training and Quartermaster training at Orlando, Fla., followed by Enlisted Submarine School at Groton, Conn. His first duty assignment was aboard USS Ethan Allen (SSN 608) where he completed submarine qualifications. Other assignments include USS Thomas Edison (SSBN 610), USS Sea Devil (SSN 664), Commander Naval Activities United Kingdom (COMNAVACTUK), USS Tecumseh (SSBN 628)(Blue), and Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMSUBPAC) Staff (TRE Team).

West was then assigned as Chief of the Boat aboard the San Diego-based fast-attack submarine, USS Portsmouth (SSN 707), where he completed two Western Pacific deployments and the crew earned two, Battle Efficiency “E” awards.

Upon completion of a Command Master Chief (CMC) tour at Submarine Squadron (COMSUBRON) ELEVEN, he was selected as COMSUBPAC Force Master Chief from January 2001 to 2004. During this time, West also attended the Senior Enlisted Academy in Newport, R.I. West then reported as the CMC to USS Preble (DDG 88) homeported in San Diego, where he deployed to the Persian Gulf and qualified as an Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist.

West was selected during his tour on the Preble to serve as the Pacific Fleet (PACFLT), Fleet Master Chief from February 2005 to June 2007. Following PACFLT, he served as the 14th Fleet Master Chief for Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command from June 2007 to December 2008.

West's personal awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (two awards), Meritorious Service Medal (three awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (four awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (two awards), Enlisted Surface Warfare Insignia, Enlisted Submarine Insignia, and SSBN Deterrent Patrol Pin.

West became the 12th Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy on Dec. 12, 2008. On September 28, 2012, he stepped down as MCPON and retired from the Navy after a three-decade career.

Mr. West joined Herdt Consulting in December 2012. He joined Paladin Data Systems as a Sales and Marketing Manager and Client Executive for Insight and Futuring in October 2013. Mr. West is currently a Program Manager at Progeny System Corporation.


Dagon also seems to have had heroic, "good" progeny in Faerûn, one for certain in the form of Captain Aulruick Thoster, one of the heroes attempting to stop the eladrin Malyanna from opening the Far Manifold with the Key of Stars in the Year of the Secret, 1396 DR. Thoster's heritage manifested itself in increments periodically during his quest originally, he believed it to be of kuo-toa origin, but eventually it was revealed to him (via an extremely painful transformation) that he was in actuality a 'demon scion' and a direct descendant of Dagon. Η]

The demon lord Dagon should not be confused with the exiled devil of the same name, who dwelled on Avernus, first layer of the Nine Hells. Originally known as Jaqon, Asmodeus forcibly changed Jaqon's name to "Dagon" to thwart attempts to summon the offender. ⎖]


Sea Devil II SSN-664 - History

The Jacksonville (SSN 699) is the 12th Los Angeles-class attack submarine and the first ship in the U.S. Navy to bear the name of the city in northern Florida. The contract to build the Jacksonville was awarded on January 24, 1972, her keel was laid down on February 21, 1976 Christened and launched on November 18, 1978 Mrs. Dorothy F. Benneth, the wife of Honorable Charles E. Bennett, served as sponsor of the ship Capt. Robert B. Wilkinson is the prospective commanding officer.

From January 25-26, 1981, the Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Jacksonville was underway for the first time to conduct Alpha "A" trials. Underway for Bravo trials from Feb. 2-13 Underway for Charlie trials from March 2-5 Delivered to the U.S. Navy on April 1.

May 16, USS Jacksonville was commissioned during a ceremony at Naval submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn.

May 30, Cmdr. Dennis G. Feuerbacher relieved Capt. Robert B. Wilkinson as CO of the SSN 699 during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk.

In June, the Jacksonville departed Norfolk for a Shakedown Cruise in the Puerto Rican Op. Area. Port visit to Naval Station Mayport, Fla.

July 7, USS Jacksonville entered the Newport News Shipyard for a five-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA). Underway for sea trials from Dec. 19-21.

January 15, 1982 The Jacksonville departed homeport for a five-week underway to conduct weapons certification testing at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) range off Andros Island, Bahamas, and sound trials at Exuma Sound. Port calls to Naval Station Rosevelt Roads, P.R. St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands and Port Everglades, Fla.

March 22, While proceeding on the surface out of Naval Station Norfolk, USS Jacksonville colided with Turkish merchant vessel "General Z. Dogan". The submarine returned to homeport immediately.

March 23, Cmdr. Dennis G. Feuerbacher was relieved as CO of the Jacksonville. Cmdr. G. Michael Hewitt assumed temporary command of the ship.

March 26, SSN 699 entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for emergent repairs. Underway for sea trials on April 27 Underway for Pre-Overseas Movement (POM) workups from May 3-21.

May 28, Cmdr. Ricky K. Morris relieved Cmdr. Hewitt as CO of the Jacksonville. Underway for POM Certification in early June.

June 15, USS Jacksonville departed Norfolk for its maiden Indian Ocean deployment. Transited Cape of Good Hope on July 1.

From July 22-26, the Jacksonville participated in exercises with the USS Forrestal (CV 59) Battle Group off the coast of Masirah, Oman. Brief stop at Diego Garcia on Aug. 4 On station at Bal el Mandeb Strait from Aug. 9-15 On station north of Socotra Island from Aug. 17-23 Conducted Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) from Aug. 28-30.

August 30, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine moored outboard the USS Sierra (AD 18) at Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Teritory, for a 24-day Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV). Conducted ASW-AIROPS operations with the USS Ranger (CV 61) BG, off the coast of Oman, from Sept. 25- Oct. 10 Operations north of Socotra Island from Oct. 10-16 On station in the vicinity of Mahe Island, Seychelles, from Oct. 18-24 On station in the vicinity of Eight and Nine Degree Chanels, Maldives, in seach of Charlie I SSGN from Oct. 26-30 Inport Diego Garcia from Nov. 7-8.

November 16, SSN 699 moored at HMAS Stirling at Garden Island, Australia, for a week-long visit to Perth. Transited Panama Canal on Dec. 11.

December 15, USS Jacksonville returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a six-month around-the-world deployment.

In February 1983, the Jacksonville was underway for Refresher Training (REFTRA) and POMCERT. Underway for Atlantic Ocean deployment from March 7 through April 21 Underway for Tactical Readiness Evaluation (TRE) at the AUTEC range on May 13 Inport Port Canaveral from May 30- June 1 Returned home on June 15.

July 19, USS Jacksonville entered the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company shipyard in Newport News, Va., for emergent repairs. Underway for sea trials in September.

October 17, SSN 699 entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

From January 3-18, 1984, the Jacksonville was underway for operations with the USS Saratoga (CV 60) in the Jacksonville Op. Area. Completed ORSE on March 27 Underway for TRE and acoustic trials from April 16-23 Underway for POMCERT from May 1-5.

May 6, USS Jacksonville departed homeport for a scheduled North Atlantic deployment.

July 9, The Jacksonville arrived in Rosyth, Scotland, for a four-day port visit. Inport Portsmouth, England, from July 16-? Returned to Norfolk on Aug. 5 Underway for local operation from Sept. 10-21 Upon return to port, SSN 699 colided with the barge positioned across Thimble Shoals Channel.

September 25, Cmdr. Ricky K. Morris was relieved as CO of the USS Jacksonville. Cmdr. Francis LaCroix assumed temporary command of the ship.

September 27, The Jacksonville entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for sonar dome replacement. Undocked on Oct. 5 Underway for acoustic trials at AUTEC on Nov. 15 Returned home for emergent repairs to diesel generator Underway again from Dec. 12-23.

December 24, Cmdr. John P. Davis relieved Cmdr. Francis LaCroix as the 6th commanding officer of Jacksonville.

In January 1985, the Jacksonville was underway for ORSE workups. Underway for REFTRA in February and POMCERT in March.

April 1, USS Jacksonville departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled Indian Ocean deployment.

May 20, The nuclear-powered submarine arrived in Mombasa, Kenya, for a five-day port visit. Upkeep in Diego Garcia from June 25- July 24.

From July 24 through September 4, USS Jacksonville conduced operations in support of Battle Group Alpha and Bravo and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) training for surface ships from these Battle Groups Inport Diego Garcia from Sept. 5-9.

September 16, SSN 699 arrived in Cockburn Sound, Australia, for a five-day port call. Upkeep in Subic Bay, Philippines, from Sept. 28- Oct. 6 Port call to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, from Oct. 18-22 Transited Panama Canal on Oct. 30 Brief stop in Norfolk to embark Nuclear Propulsion Examination Board (NPEB) personnel for ORSE on Nov. 5.

November 8, USS Jacksonville returned to homeport after a seven-month around-the-world cruise, steaming more than 63,500 nautical miles.

In January 1986, the Jacksonville completed a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment. Underway in suupport of FLEETEX 1-86 and TRE Preps. in February Inport Naval station Mayport in early March for a liberty visit to its namesake city.

April 25, USS Jacksonville departed Norfolk for a North Atlantic deployment.

June 13, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine pulled into Portsmouth, England, for a three-day port call. Returned home on June 29 Underway for Midshipmen cruise from July 21-25.

August 1, USS Jacksonville entered the Medium Auxiliary Floating Drydock Resolute (AFDM 10) at Norfolk for a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA). Underway for ORSE workups in October Inport Port Canaveral, Fla., from Oct. 23-24 Completed ORSE on Oct. 31 Underway for Tactical Readiness Evaluation (TRE) and POM workups in December.

January ?, 1987 USS Jacksonville departed Naval Station Norfolk for its maiden Mediterranean deployment. Returned in June.

From January through March 1988, the Jacksonville was underway for a shock trials test program for Los Angeles-class submarines in the Arctic Circle.

November 10, 1989 Cmdr. Timothy J. Traverso relieved Cmdr. A. J. Watson as CO of the Jacksonville.

January 17, 1991 USS Jacksonville moved from Dry Dock #2 to Beth 6 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Underway for sea trials on Dec. 2.

December 10, SSN 699 returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a three-year Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO).

From January 6-26, 1992, the Jacksonville was underway for acoustic trials at the AUTEC range. Underway for INSURV assessment on Feb. 12 Completed Phase III Sonar Certification in the Virginia Capes Op. Area on April 10 Completed Weapons Certification on May 22 Completed battery changeout pierside at Naval Station Norfolk on June 29.

August 3, USS Jacksonville returned to homeport after a four-week underway for Tactical Weapons Certification (TWC) and a port visit to Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Underway for ORSE from Sept. 16-17.

September 26, Cmdr. William W. Matzelevich relieved Cmdr. Timothy J. Traverso as the 9th CO of Jacksonville.

October 22, SSN 699 returned to Norfolk after participating in a joint U.S.-United Kingdom operations at AUTEC range and a port visit to Port Everglades, Fla., for Broward County Navy Days.

November 20, USS Jacksonville entered the floating dry-dock USS Oak Ridge (ARDM 1) at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., for emergent repairs. Undocked on Dec. 14 Returned home on Dec. 19 Completed magnetic deperming at Lambert's Point, Va., on Dec. 23.

From January 5-14, 1993, the Jacksonville was underway for a Tactical Readiness Evaluation (TRE) and POMCERT.

January 22, USS Jacksonville departed Norfolk for a scheduled Mediterranean deployment.

March 4, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine pulled into Gibraltar, British Crown Colony, for a three-day port call. Brief stop at Naples, Italy, on March 10.

April 9, SSN 699 moored outboard the USS Simon Lake (AS 33) at Santo Stefano Naval Base in La Maddalena, Sardinia, for a 32-day Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV). Port call to Souda Bay, Greece, from May 14-20 Brief stops in Augusta Bay, Sicily, on June 15 and Naples on June 16 Departed Mediterranean on June 18 Brief stop at Naval Annex, Bermuda, to embark NPEB personal for ORSE on June 28.

June 30, USS Jacksonville returned to homeport after more than a five-month deployment.

August 7, The Jacksonville departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise. Underway for MK 48 ADCAP development testing from Aug. 13-25.

August 30, SSN 699 emergency sortied from Norfolk to avoid the Hurricane Emily. Returned on Sept. 5 Underway for local operations from Oct. 26- Nov. 12.

December 16, USS Jacksonville entered the floating dry-dock USS Resolute at Naval Station Norfolk for a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA). Undocked on March 8, 1993 Underway for sea trials from March 28- April 1.

April 22, The Jacksonville departed homeport for routine training at AUTEC range. Port call to Naval Station Mayport from April 29- May 3 Inport Groton, Conn., for training availability from May 6-20 Returned to Norfolk on May 23 Underway for local operations from May 31- June 7, June 8-9 and 13-27th Moored outboard the USS L. Y. Spear (AS 36) for a five-week upkeep Underway for sea trials from Aug. 1-3 Underway for local operations from Aug. 15-19 Underway for POMCERT from Aug. 29-31.

September 12, USS Jacksonville departed Norfolk for a scheduled North Atlantic deployment.

November 10, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine moored at Haakonsvern naval base in Bergen, Norway, for a five-day port visit.

November 25, The Jacksonville moored at Carrier Pier 3 in Brest, France, for a port visit after participating in a joint exercise COVEX 3-94. Returned home in December.

January 10, 1995 USS Jacksonville entred the Dry Dock # 4 at Newport News Shipyard for a three-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA). Moved from dry-dock to Pier 6 at Newport News on March 6 Underway for sea trials from March 31- April 3.

April 7, Cmdr. John F. Jarbro, Jr., relieved Cmdr. William W. Matzelevich as commanding officer of SSN 699.

April 13, USS Jacksonville moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) at Naval Station Norfolk for upkeep. Underway on April 24 Inport Naval submarine Base New London for TRAV from April 28- May 12 Returned home on May 21 Underway for local operations from May 22-23 Underway for operations at AUTEC range from May 25- June 2 Underway for local operations from June 5-8 and 12-19th In dry-dock Resolute from July 6-18 Underway for sea trials from July 25-28 Underway for local operations from Aug. 7-11.

August 15, The Jacksonville emergency sortied from Naval Station Norfolk to avoid the Hurricane Felix. Returned on Aug. 19 Underway for local operations from Aug. 28- Sept. 1.

January 6, 1996 USS Jacksonville commenced an Intermediate Maintenance Availability (IMAV) with the USS Emory S. Land. Underway for sea trials from Feb. 7-8 Underway for local operations from Feb. 12-16.

From February 22 through March 14, SSN 699 was underway for operations at AUTEC range. Port call to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., from March 8-12 Underway for local operations from March 15-16, 18-22 and March 25- April 3 Underway again on May 13.

May 17, USS Jacksonville crashed into the Saudi Makkah cargo ship in thick fog in the Chesapeake Bay. Both ships suffered significant damage but no one was injured. The submarine returned to Naval Station Norfolk immediately Moved to Pier 4 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on May 23.

May 29, Cmdr. John F. Jarbro, Jr., was relieved as CO of the SSN 699. Cmdr. Richard N. Current assumed temporary command of the Jacksonville.

June 20, USS Jacksonville entered the Dry Dock #2 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard for emergent repairs.

August 14, Cmdr. Robert A. Gurczynski relieved Cmdr. Richard N. Current as the 12th CO of Jacksonville.

September 16, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine moved from dry-dock to Pier 23 at Naval Station Norfolk. Underway for sea trials from Oct. 11-15 Underway for acoustic trials at AUTEC range on Oct. 25 Port visit to Port Everglades, Fla., from Oct. 31- Nov. 5 Brief stop in Port Canaveral on Nov. 9 Commenced COMPTUEX Phase I with the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) BG on Nov. 14 Brief stops at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, on Nov. 22 and 24th Inport Roosevelt Roads again from Nov. 26- Dec. 1 Commenced upkeep with USS Emory S. Land on January 6, 1997.

From February 7-14, USS Jacksonville was underway for COMPTUEX Phase II in the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point Op. Areas. Underway for local operations from Feb. 19-20 Underway for JTFEX 97-2 from March 7- April 2 Underway for local operations from April 3-4.

April 29, USS Jacksonville departed Norfolk for a scheduled Mediterranean deployment as part of the JFK Battle Group. Brief stop in Naval Station Rota, Spain, on May 12.

May 15, SSN 699 moored outboard the USS Simon Lake in La Maddalena, Sardinia, for a four-day FMAV.

May 30, The Jacksonville moored at Milhaud Pier 6W in Toulon Naval Base, France, for a four-day port call after participating in exercise Iles D'Or '97. Inport Gibraltar from June 11-17 Brief stops in Cagliari, Italy, on June 19 and 21st Upkeep in La Maddalena from July 1-7 after participated in exercise SHAREM 121 Inport Souda Bay from July 20-26 Port call to Rota, Spain, from Aug. 1-7 Brief stops in La Maddalena on Aug. 14 and 18th.

August 23, USS Jacksonville moored outboard the USS Simon Lake at Santo Stefano Naval Base in La Maddalena, Italy, for a 16-day upkeep after participating in exercise Shark Hunt.

September 10, The Jacksonville anchored off Cartagena, Spain, for a port visit before participating in exercise Tapon. Returned to homeport on Oct. 28.

January 2, 2000 SSN 699 departed Naples, Italy, after a week-long port visit. Inport La Maddalena from Jan. 3-4 Brief stop in Taranto, Italy, on Jan. 6 Upkeep in La Maddalena from Feb. 6-16 Port call to Gibraltar from March 4-6 Brief stop at Bermuda on March 15.

March 17, USS Jacksonville returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment, with the USS John F. Kennedy Battle Group, in the U.S. 6th Fleet AoR.

From April 27-29, the Jacksonville was underway for local operations. Underway again from June 5-22.

July 2, SSN 699 arrived in Naval Weapons Station Earle, N.J., for an eight-day visit to participate in International Naval Review 2000 and OpSail New York.

From Feb. 27 through March 27, 2001, the Jacksonville was underway for COMPTUEX/JTFEX in the Puerto Rican Op. Area. Brief stops at Roosevelt Roads on March 8 and 12th.

April 25, USS Jacksonville departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled Mediterranean deployment, as part of the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Battle Group.

May 14, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land at Santo Stefano Naval Base in La Maddalena, Sardinia, for a five-day FMAV.

June 2, USS Jacksonville pulled into Toulon, France, for a six-day port call after participating in a two-week exercise Trident D'or off Sardinia. Inport La Maddalena again from June 10-15.

June 27, The Jacksonville moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land, anchored off Dubrovnik, Croatia, for a four-day port visit after participating in a week-long exercise Iron Hammer.

July 5, SSN 699 pulled into Aksaz Naval Base for a six-day visit to Marmaris, Turkey.

From January 8-11, 2002, the Jacksonville was underway in the Virginia Capes OPAREA. Underway again from Jan. 20-27 Underway from March 29- April 6 Port call to Port Canaveral, Fla., from April 1-4 Underway for local operations from April 17-22.

May 1, USS Jacksonville departed Norfolk for a Prospective Commanding Officer (PCO) operations. Port call to Port Canaveral from May 6-8 Inport Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, from May 12-14, 17-21 and 24-27th Returned home on June 5 Underway for a port visit to Port Canaveral on July 22 Inport PCAN from July 31- Aug. 1 Port visit Mayport, Fla., from Aug. 2-6 Returned home on Aug. 9.

December 9, SSN 699 entered the floating dry-dock Resolute (AFDM 10) at Naval Station Norfolk for a four-month Interim Drydocking (IDD) availability. The list of critical path work items included preservation of 20 internal tanks, Special Hull Treatment (SHT) replacement, restoration of main seawater hull and backup valves, preservation of all main ballast tanks, steering and diving system inspection and repair, including removal and restoration of the Fairwater planes, restoration of some ventilation valves and the use of four hull cuts.

March 16, 2003 USS Jacksonville departed dry-dock Resolute and moored at Naval Station Norfolk. Underway for sea trials from April 21-29.

May 2, Cmdr. John S. O'Neill relieved Cmdr. Michael W. Brown as the 14th CO of Jacksonville.

May 12, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine departed homeport for local operations. Inport Naval Station Mayport from May 22-28 Returned home on May 30 Underway for local operations from June 17-20 and 25-27th Underway for undisclosed operations on July 25 Inport Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., from Aug. 23-29 Returned home on Sept. 5.

September 16, USS Jacksonville departed Naval Station Norfolk for a southern Atlantic deployment.

September 20, The Jacksonville pulled into Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., for a four-day port visit.

December 19, USS Jacksonville returned to Norfolk after a three-month underway period.

December 20, 2004 A small fire broke out aboard USS Jacksonville while undergoing an Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO) at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine. The fire was immediately extinguished and the reactor was never in danger, though a shipyard firefighter and a sailor were treated at the scene for smoke inhalation.

June 22, 2007 SSN 699 pulled into Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a port visit to its namesake city.

May 30, 2008 USS Jacksonville departed Norfolk for its first deployment after more than four years.

June 11, The Jacksonville departed HMNB Portsmouth, England, after a routine port call.

November 24, USS Jacksonville returned to homeport after a six-month deployment in support of maritime security operations.

December 12, Cmdr. Tyler L. Meador relieved Cmdr. John Kropcho, III as CO of SSN 699, who retired at the ceremony after serving the Navy for 24 years.

April 3, 2009 USS Jacksonville arrived at its new homeport of Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, after a 28-day transit from Norfolk, Va., as part of the 60/40 split of submarine force assets, between the Pacific and Atlantic Fleets, as designated in the 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review.

June 2, 2010 USS Jacksonville departed Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

August 27, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine pulled into Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine port call.

October 16, SSN 699 departed Sepanggar Naval Base after a five-day port visit to Malaysia.

December 2, USS Jacksonville returned home after a six-month deployment.

February 4, 2011 Cmdr. Nathan B. Sukols relieved Cmdr. Tyler L. Meador as CO of the Jacksonville during a change-of-command ceremony at Pearl Harbor.

November 5, 2012 USS Jacksonville departed Pearl Harbor for a scheduled deployment.

November 15, The Jacksonville moored at Berth 13S in Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, for a six-day port call.

January 10, 2013 USS Jacksonville collided with a small fishing vessel in the Arabian Gulf, around 5 a.m. local, damaging one of its periscopes. No one on the sub is injured. The civilian vessel continued on its course and speed.

January 12, SSN 699 pulled into Khalifa Bin Salman Port in Hidd, Bahrain, for damage assessment.

January 23, The Jacksonville moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) at KBSP to get tender support services. Transited to Mina Salman Pier in Manama on Feb. 1.

February 10, Rear Adm. Phillip G. Sawyer, commander of Submarine Group 7 and Task Force 74/54, relieved of command Cmdr. Nathan B. Sukol due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to command." The XO, Lt. Cmdr. Lauren Allen, is also fired. Cmdr. Richard E. Seif assumed temporary command of the USS Jacksonville.

April 9, The Jacksonville pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, for a brief port call.

June 18, USS Jacksonville returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after a seven-and-a-half month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

August 2, Cmdr. Matthew R. Boland relieved Cmdr. Richard E. Seif as CO of the Jacksonville during a change-of-command ceremony on board the sub at Pearl Harbor.

August 7, Rear Adm. Phillip G. Sawyer relieved Rear Adm. James F. Caldwell, Jr., as Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMSUBPAC) and Commander, Task Force 134 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the SSN 699.

April ?, 2015 USS Jacksonville departed Pearl Harbor for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

April 21, The Jacksonville arrived in White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa, for a brief stop to conduct personnel transfer.

May 26, USS Jacksonville moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land at Sepanggar Naval Base, Malaysia, for a liberty port visit to Kota Kinabalu.

June 25, The Jacksonville moored at Diamantina Pier, HMAS Stirling on Garden Island, Australia, for a six-day liberty port visit to Perth.

July 27, SSN 699 moored at Berth 5, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a liberty port visit after participated in a biennial joint exercise Talisman Sabre off the northern coast of Australia.

August 6, USS Jacksonville is currently underway off the east coast of Java Island in support of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Indonesia Brief stop off White Beach, Okinawa, for personnel transfer on Aug. 20.

October 16, USS Jacksonville moored at Sierra 11 Wharf on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam following a six-and-a-half month deployment.

November 25, Cmdr. Steven E. Faulk relieved Cmdr. Matthew R. Boland as CO of the Jacksonville during a change-of-command ceremony on board the sub at Pearl Harbor.

December 6, 2016 USS Jacksonville is currently moored at Wharf S1A on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

January 17, 2017 USS Jacksonville departed Pearl Harbor for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

March 31, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine recently moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for a liberty port visit to Manama.

July 3, USS Jacksonville moored at Berth 5, RSS Singapura (The ex-Changi Naval Base) for a liberty port visit to Singapore.

August 10, USS Jacksonville moored at Wharf S1A on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing its 15th and final deployment. The sub traveled more than 48,000 nautical miles and also made port calls to Oman and Guam.

August 31, The Jacksonville moved from Wharf S1A to Wharf S1B on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

September 11, Rear Adm. Daryl L. Caudle relieved Rear Adm. Frederick J. Roegge as Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMSUBPAC) during a change-of-command ceremony on board the SSN 699.

September 18, USS Jacksonville departed Pearl Harbor for routine operations in the Hawaiian Op. Area Moored at Wharf S21A on Sept. 2?.

October 4, The Jacksonville moored at Wharf W4, Naval Magazine Lualualei for ammo offload Moored at Wharf S1B on Oct. 6 Underway again on Oct. 11 Brief stop in Pearl Harbor for personnel transfer on Oct. 13 Moored at Wharf S1A on Oct. 26.

December 4, USS Jacksonville departed Pearl Harbor for the last time en route to Bremerton, Wash., to commence a year-long inactivation process at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Moored at Berth 6, Delta Pier in Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton on Dec. 11.

April 19, 2018 Cmdr. David C. Vehon relieved Cmdr. Steven E. Faulk as CO of the Jacksonville, during a change-of-command ceremony at Olympic Lodge on Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton.

May 1, USS Jacksonville is inactivated and placed in Reserve (Stand Down) status.

June 26, USS Jacksonville held a decommissioning ceremony at the Undersea Museum in Keyport, Wash., after 38-years of active service.

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Sea Devil II SSN-664 - History

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The very first translation of the Hebrew Bible was made into Greek, probably as early as the third century BC. This, the so-called Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, is traditionally dated to the reign of Ptolemy II Philadelphus of Egypt (285-246 BC).

The Origins of the Septuagint

The very first translation of the Hebrew Bible was made into Greek, probably as early as the third century BC. This, the so-called Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, is traditionally dated to the reign of Ptolemy II Philadelphus of Egypt (285-246 BC).

It is commonly called the 'Septuagint' version (from the Latin for 'seventy') because according to the traditional account of its origin, preserved in the so-called Letter of Aristeas, it had seventy-two translators. This letter tells how King Ptolemy II commissioned the royal librarian, Demetrius of Phaleron, to collect by purchase or by copying all the books in the world. He wrote a letter to Eleazar, the high priest at Jerusalem, requesting six elders of each tribe, in total seventy-two men, of exemplary life and learned in the Torah, to translate it into Greek.

On arrival at Alexandria, the translators were greeted by the king and given a sumptuous banquet. They were then closeted in a secluded house on the island of Pharos close to the seashore, where the celebrated 110 m. high lighthouse, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, had just been finished.

According to the Letter of Aristeas, the translation, made under the direction of Demetrius, was completed in seventy-two days. When the Alexandrian Jewish community assembled to hear a reading of the new version, the translators and Demetrius received lavish praise, and a curse was pronounced on anyone who should alter the text by addition, transposition or omission. The work was then read to the king who, according to the Letter of Aristeas, marveled at the mind of the lawgiver. The translators were then sent back to Jerusalem, endowed with gifts for themselves and the high priest Eleazar.

Later generations embellished the story. Philo of Alexandria, writing in the first century AD, says that each of the seventy-two translators were shut in a separate cell, and miraculously all the texts were said to agree exactly with one another, thus proving that their version was directly inspired by God.

Origins in Retrospect

It is difficult to know how much credence to give to these accounts. There are several known historical inaccuracies in the Letter of Aristeas. It is known that on the assumption of his throne, Ptolemy II banished Demetrius of Phaleron. One of those credited as being present at the banquet, a certain Menodemus of Eritria, is known to have died two years before Ptolemy II succeeded to the throne. But even if the stories relating to the origin of the Septuagint are not true, at least not in all the details, it seems likely that Ptolemy II at least instigated a translation of the Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible.

The Significance of the Septuagint

The significance of the Septuagint translation can hardly be overestimated. Following the conquests of Alexander the Great (336-323 BC), Greek became the official language of Egypt, Syria and the eastern end of the Mediterranean Sea. The Septuagint translation made the Hebrew scriptures available both to the Jews who no longer spoke their ancestral language and to the entire Greek-speaking world. The Septuagint was later to become the Bible of the Greek-speaking early Church, and is frequently quoted in the New Testament.

Hints of the Egyptian Origin of the Septuagint

Does the Septuagint translation itself give any hints of its supposed Egyptian origins? In Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14 are given a list of unclean animals and birds, that is, creatures that the Israelites were prohibited from eating. The precise identification of many of the birds in the list of unclean birds remains uncertain. The list is an ornithologist's delight but a translator's nightmare. The detailed identification of the birds need not concern us here. Even the accuracy of the Septuagint's translation here need not concern us either.

In Lev.11:22 we encounter a bird called yanshuph. The Septuagint translates this ibis, a bird that the Egyptians knew as hbj. The Septuagint's translation 'ibis' is followed by the Revised Standard Version. Yanshuph, however, is rendered as a kind of owl by the majority of English versions.

The Hebrew bird qa'a of Lev. 11:18 is rendered 'pelican' by some English versions. Here they are following the Septuagint's pelekan. However, a number of English translations do not follow the Septuagint, and opt for another type of owl.

Earlier in the chapter is a list of unclean animals. Arnebet is clearly the 'rabbit' or 'hare.' Yet in both versions of the list it is not translated by lagos, the normal Greek word for 'rabbit' or 'hare.' Lev. 11:6 has the word choirogryllion meaning a 'young pig,' and Dt. 14:7 has a euphemism, dasypous, 'rough foot.' Another Greek translation, that of Aquila, uses lagos. The reason for avoiding lagos appears to be that Ptolemy II's grandfather was nicknamed 'Lagos,' apparently because of his large ears!

A more famous and ultimately more significant example concerns the term 'Red Sea.' In Hebrew it is yam suph meaning 'reed sea,' a term which was used most famously to describe the body of water that the Israelites crossed as they escaped from Egypt. This body of water is often thought to be the lakes or salt water marshes at the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba. The Septuagint, however, renders it Erythra thalassa meaning 'Red Sea,' and it is this translation that is used by the New Testament in Acts 7:36 and Hebrews 11:39. All English versions apart from the Jerusalem Bible stick with this tradition.

But where did the term 'Red Sea' come from? It may be significant that the Hebrew term Edom means 'red,' and the Edomites occupied the area south of Israel towards the Gulf of Aqaba. This sea may have been popularly known as the Edomite or Red Sea. Another explanation is that it was named 'red' from the predominant color of the Edomite and Arabian mountains which border the Gulf of Aqaba.

Distinctive Features of the Septuagint Translation

A number of the special distinctive features of the Septuagint should be pointed out. In Proverbs 6:8b, after the Hebrew proverb of the ant, the Septuagint adds a Greek proverb of the bee. 'Or go to the bee and learn how diligent she is, and how earnestly she is engaged in her work whose labors kings and private men use for health, and she is desired and respected by all, though weak in body she is advanced by honoring wisdom.'

The original Septuagint translation of Daniel was thought to be too much of a paraphrase. It was replaced by another translation whose origins would seem to lie in Asia Minor, that ascribed to Theodotion at the end of the second century AD. Indeed, only one manuscript of the Septuagint of Daniel has survived - a tenth-century manuscript from the Chigi collection in the Vatican.

In the long passage in Daniel 11 about the kings of the north and the kings of the south, the original Septuagint of Daniel consistently translates the term 'king of the south' by 'king of Egypt.' The version of Theodotion, which largely superseded it, has 'king of the south' throughout.

More significantly, the four letters YHWH that form the personal name of God in the Hebrew Text are rendered ho Kyrios throughout the Septuagint. This is the usage, traditionally rendered 'the LORD' in English versions, which is adopted by writers of the New Testament and is still by far the most common nomenclature for the divine name.

There are numerous examples where the writers of the New Testament follow the Septuagint translation rather than the Hebrew text. Four examples will suffice:

1) For Genesis 47:31, where the Hebrew text says 'Israel worshipped as he leaned on top of his bed,' it is rendered 'on top of his staff' in the Septuagint and Hebrews 11:21.
2) Where the Hebrew text of Ps.8:5 has 'You made him a little lower than God and crowned him with glory and honor,' the Septuagint and Hebrews 2:7 have
'You made him a little lower than the angels and crowned him with glory and honor.'
3) In Ps.16:10, where the Hebrew text has 'Because you will not abandon me to Sheol, nor let your Holy One see the pit,' the Septuagint and Acts 2:27 have
'Because you will not abandon me to Hades, nor will you let your Holy One see decay.'
4) 'Sacrifice and offering you did not desire, but my ears you have pierced' in Ps. 40:6 becomes 'Sacrifice and offering you did not desire, but a body you have prepared for me' in the Septuagint and Hebrews 10:5. Here the Septuagint translators are explaining the metaphor, not just in terms of the ear, but in terms of the whole body of the LORD's servant listening and obeying the LORD's command.

Limitations of the Septuagint

The Orthodox Church argues that the Septuagint is more accurate than the Hebrew Bible and should be used in Bible translation. However, it is good to be aware of some of the Septuagint's limitations.


6 Shackles And Restraints

As soon as the men were on the island, they were placed in shackles. During the day, they moved about in chains, but at night, they were often double-shackled so that they couldn&rsquot move during sleep.

The men suffered from starvation, and many died from fever. Their bodies would be loaded onto wheelbarrows and dumped into the sea. A funeral bell was rung, which may as well have been a dinner bell because witnesses stated that when the bell rang, the sharks began to circle about, waiting for whatever was to be tossed into the waters.


8. Believers cannot be demon inhabited.

Can believers be demon inhabited? This is a question which many ask. Theologically considered, it is hard to believe that it is possible that a believer can both be a dwelling place for a demon and the temple of the indwelling Holy Spirit (1 Cor. 6:19 and 2 Cor. 6:16). However, there is every reason to believe that a believer may be demonized in the sense of oppressed by demonic malevolence (1 Pet. 5:8–9). Likewise, the devil may actively seek to harass a godly servant as Paul tells the Corinthians (2 Cor. 12:7). In brief: inhabited, no oppressed, yes.


B-1 Units

1 can chicken and noodles
1 can turkey loaf, cut up into pieces
1 can cheese spread
12 spoons milk
Crackers from one C-Ration can, crumbled
Salt & pepper to taste
2 spoons butter or oil or fat-
2 spoons flour
3 dashes TABASCO

Melt butter oil or fat, add flour and stir until
smooth. Add milk and continue to cook until cheese melts and sauce is even. Empty cans of turkey loaf and chicken noodles into cheese sauce.

"Then soldiers discovered it was an extremely simple, lightweight, multipurpose tool. I think in warfare, the simpler something is and the easier access it has, the more you're going to use it. The P-38 had all of those things going for it."

The tool acquired its name from the 38 punctures required to open a C-ration can, and from the boast that it performed with the speed of the World War II P-38 fighter plane.

"Soldiers just took to the P-38 naturally," said World War II veteran John Bandola. "It was our means for eating 90 percent of the time, but we also used it for cleaning boots and fingernails, as a screwdriver, you name it. We all carried it on our dog tags or key rings." When Bandola attached his first and only P-38 to his key ring a half century ago, it accompanied him to Anzio, Salerno and through northern Italy. It was with him when World War II ended, and it's with him now. "This P-38 is a symbol of my life then," said Bandola. "The Army, the training, my fellow soldiers, all the times we shared during a world war."

Sgt. Ted Paquet, swing shift supervisor in the Fort Monmouth Provost Marshal's Office, was a 17-year-old seaman serving aboard the amphibious assault ship USS New Orleans during the Vietnam war when he got his first P-38. The ship's mission was to transport Marines off the coast of Da Nang.

On occasional evenings, Marines gathered near Paquet's duty position on the fantail for simple pleasures like "Cokes, cigarettes, conversation and C-rations." It was during one of these nightly sessions that Paquet came in contact with the P-38, or "John Wayne" as it's referred to in the Navy.

Paquet still carries his P-38, and he still finds it useful. While driving with his older brother, Paul, their car's carburettor began to have problems. "There were no tools in the car and, almost simultaneously, both of us reached for P-38s attached to our key rings," Paquet said with a grin. "We used my P-38 to adjust the flow valve, the car worked perfectly, and we went on our merry way."

Paquet's P-38 is in a special box with his dog tags, a .50-caliber round from the ship he served on, his Vietnam Service Medal, South Vietnamese money and a surrender leaflet from Operation Desert Storm provided by a nephew. "It will probably be on my dresser until the day I die," Paquet said.

The feelings veterans have for the P-38 aren't hard to understand, according to 1st Sgt. Steve Wilson of the Chaplain Centre and School at Fort Monmouth. "When you hang on to something for 26 years," he said, "it's very hard to give it up. That's why people keep their P-38 just like they do their dog tags. It means a lot. It's become part of you. You remember field problems, jumping at 3 a.m. and moving out. A P-38 has you reliving all the adventures that came with soldiering in the armed forces. Yes, the P-38 opened cans, but it did much more. Any soldier will tell you that."

Courtesy of Soldier's Online

A better stove was created by simply using the can opener end of a "church key" (a flat metal device designed to open soft drink and beer containers with a bottle opener on one end and can opener on the other commonly used before the invention of the pull tab and screw-off bottle top) to puncture triangular holes around the top and bottom rims of the can which resulted in a hotter fire and much less fumes. With this type of stove only half a Trioxin heat tab was needed to heat the meal and then the other half could be used to heat water for coffee or cocoa. A small chunk of C-4 explosive could also be substituted for the Trioxin tablet for faster heating. It would burn hotter and was much better for heating water.
.
A stove was usually carried in the back pack or cargo pocket and used repeatedly until the metal began to fail.

Australian troops were always issued with hexamine stoves and so did not have to create this type.

US Operational Rations in World War II

As a result of these developments, the Army entered World War II with two established special-purpose rations-Field Ration D and Field Ration C. Ration D (see below) was used throughout the war as the Army's emergency ration and as a supplement to other rations. The C ration went through an evolution which ultimately produced an outstanding ration for the purpose it was designed to meet-a daily food which the soldier could carry and use when he was cut off from regular food supply sources.

The use of these rations after 1941 revealed their inability to meet all the many feeding problems imposed by new combat conditions. Therefore, a succession of rations, individual food packets, and ration supplements was developed and came into use before the war's end. The haste attached to the initial wartime ration development indicated that the country was no better prepared to cope with the food problem in 1941 than with other problems of war supply. The early trial-and-error method was proof, too, that haste made waste. Nevertheless the food program ultimately evolved for the American soldier was firmly based on the premise-"that all troops . . . be fed the best food available in the best and most appetizing form within the realm of reasonable possibility particularly . . . troops in combat." 31 For the citizen soldier, for the most part accustomed to good food in civilian life, "what do we eat" became as important, if not more so, than "when do we eat." In addition to providing an acceptable answer to this query, ration developers had to pay equal attention to military utilization, to stability and storage requirements, to nutritional values, to demands for shipping space, and to the necessity of going beyond commercial practices to protect packaged foods on the long journey from American factories to theatres of action. Add factors of war born shortages of material and the continued necessity for providing adequate interim substitutes and the magnitude of the ration-development problem in World War II becomes evident.

Despite obstacles, many varied and excellent rations, packets, and supplements were developed and supplied to the World War II soldier. In volume, approximately one billion special rations, costing about 675 millions of dollars, were procured between 1941 and 1945 (see table 1).

The list includes such individual rations as the lightweight K ration, the emergency D ration, and the food-for-a-day C ration. Need of rations in specific climates produced the mountain, jungle, and desert rations. Packets produced for subsistence requirements in flight were an aircrew lunch, a parachute-emergency packet, and an in-flight combat meal. At-sea survival called for lifeboat and life raft rations and pointed to the desirability of all-purpose survival foods. Supplements were designed to augment other rations:

namely, the aid-station and hospital beverage packs that provided beverages for casualties at advance medical posts, and the kitchen spice pack for use by mobile kitchens. At the end of the war, the assault packet, intended to provide a quick-energy snack before combat, was in production.

other details from several American sites

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